More shit from whitey

December 19, 2008 at 5:45 am (Uncategorized)

This time from Whitey AKA jimmy@aol.com (probably not real email, whitey not that stupid)

I’d love to know which one of the janitors in my building keeps posting on this site about whitey. I’ll have you’re low-class dark ass out on the street so fast it’ll make your bean eating head spin. Why don’t you mind your business and get back to work taking out the trash and cleaning up after your masters.

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Hotels spring up in unsold condos

December 15, 2008 at 12:54 am (88Greenwich, Buttonwood Real Estate, douche, Douche Of The Day, Douchebag Dormitory, Greenwich Club Residences, New York, Wall Street) (, , , , , , , , )

According to Crain’s New York (full article below),  there are possible illegal short term rentals in the Douchebag Dormitory AKA 88 Greenwich. Is the Andrew Heiberger, developer, responsible? No comment? Suspicious.

Hmm, that doesn’t explain the douchebag factor though.  Not all the douchebags are tourists or visiting businessmen.  Some actually own and live here full time.  Besides the douchebaggery of it all, there is also some downright stupidity, like this quote from an 88 Greenwich owner:

Condo owners are becoming suspicious. “You’ll see people in the lobby, eating breakfast, and they’re just not dressed like they’re going to work,” says one resident who lives at 88 Greenwich, where breakfast service is a prized amenity. The resident requested anonymity because the homeowners’ association is feuding with the building’s developers about this very issue. The building remains 20% unsold, according to its management office, which also insists that the building does not offer rentals.

No rentals? How about the National @ 88 Greenwich Street? Or Oakwood Worldwide?  Hell, you can even book on Expedia.  There is plenty reason to be suspicious that the building is being used as a hotel because of internet postings like the National and Oakwood, but “not dressed like they are going to work”?  LAME.   RE-TAARDED.  Not all of us are suits.  Nor do all of us work 9 to 5 jobs.   Don’t forget the trophy wives and the trustafarians.  Also, so people get dressed AFTER they eat breakfast.  So sorry neighbor, your 15 minutes of anonymous fame in a news article just make you sound like a ‘tard.   You need better evidence than that.  Like how about the people in suitcases being “checked-in” by the doorman when they arrive at the building.  Now you are building a case here.  But “just not dressed like they’re going to work” makes you sound like a dipshit.

I can wait until this shit hits the fan.

Hotels spring up in unsold condos

By Hilary Potkewitz

Published: December 14, 2008 – 5:59 am

With tourism on the wane, posh hotels like the Plaza are grappling with fewer bookings. They’re also facing competition from an unlikely source: Manhattan landlords.

Building owners have long dabbled in the hospitality industry, illegally renting out empty units in their properties on a short-term or nightly basis. But in a new twist, the clandestine hotels are popping up in luxury apartment buildings in the financial district, where developers have struggled to sell all their units.

“We get a steady stream of complaints from around Manhattan,” says Shari Hyman, director of the mayor’s office of special enforcement, which is charged with rooting out illegal hotels. “But the problem of places downtown and in the Wall Street area has been coming to our attention recently.”

These illegal hotels tend to appear in older, rent-stabilized buildings and tenements, in midtown or the Upper East and Upper West sides. By comparison, the newest crop of accommodations offer quite an upgrade.

The downtown building boom led to a glut of luxury condo developments in former office buildings near Wall Street. As several of these high-rises remain unfilled, developers and landlords are making “other arrangements” to squeeze a return out of their investment.

Offering these vacant units as short-term “corporate housing,” which falls into a gray area of the law, they’ve found willing occupants in the influx of visiting professionals dealing with the unraveling of Wall Street, as well as tourists looking for deals.

A quick search of sites such as Hotels.com, Expedia.com or Craigslist reveals a host of short-term rental options in fancy downtown buildings such as 88 Greenwich St. and the Ocean Building—decidedly not the one-night-stand type.

Lots of extras

“Building amenities include full concierge service, library, deluxe sundeck, party room, billiards room and a full fitness center with complimentary yoga,” reads travel site Expedia.com’s description of 88 Greenwich. Calls to the building’s developer, Buttonwood Real Estate President Andrew Heiberger, were not returned.

Craigslist postings offer rates ranging from $175 to $250 or more per night in the Ocean Building, a luxury residence at 1 West St. The management office of building owner Moinian Group confirms that both leasing agents for the Ocean Building and individual owners post on Craigslist for short-term rentals.

Meanwhile, two-bedroom units for sale in these buildings were recently listed in the $1.6 million to $1.7 million range.

Throughout the city, complaints about landlords operating illegal hotels rose sharply in 2008, according to data recently released by the Mayor’s Office of Special Enforcement. City authorities have raided 55 suspected establishments so far this year, issuing 310 violations—a 17% increase over last year, when they conducted 32 surprise inspections.

Condo owners are becoming suspicious. “You’ll see people in the lobby, eating breakfast, and they’re just not dressed like they’re going to work,” says one resident who lives at 88 Greenwich, where breakfast service is a prized amenity. The resident requested anonymity because the homeowners’ association is feuding with the building’s developers about this very issue. The building remains 20% unsold, according to its management office, which also insists that the building does not offer rentals.

The remaining units may not be sold for some time. Downtown condos have become even harder to sell recently, as prices in more desirable areas of the city drop, says real estate agent Avi Bellucha, an owner of a Manhattan Connection franchise.

“The major appeal of the financial district was getting into a luxury apartment building for less money,” Mr. Bellucha says. “Why would you move there now, when for the same amount you can get a great apartment in a proper neighborhood?”

The financial district is only the latest addition to the illegal hotel circuit. The rest of the city has been grappling with the issue for years.

State Sen. Liz Krueger, who once counted nearly 200 illegal hotels in her midtown district, recently proposed legislation to increase the penalties for hospitality hustling. The current fine is just $800 per building. “It’s a huge problem and can be scary for a lot of people,” says Ms. Krueger. “You like to think you know your neighbors.”

Adapting grudgingly

Residents in those buildings have learned to adapt to revolving neighbors, though grudgingly.

Murray Hill resident Jeremy Redleaf, a 24-year old voice-over producer, describes himself and his roommates as the only “real tenants” in their East Side apartment building. The other apartments play host to a diverse cast of characters, ranging from diplomats to attachés, actors to escorts.

“You hear lots of shuffling and moving furniture at weird times,” says Mr. Redleaf. “They’re in and out so fast, there’s no point in really getting to know the people.”

CHECKOUT TIME

2007
Illegal hotel locations inspected
32
Total violations issued 257

2008 (through Oct. 31)
Illegal hotel locations inspected
55
Total violations issued 310

Source: Mayor’s Office of Special Enforcement

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